About Me


Rev. Beltran Esrame Pacatang

General Secretary

Saturday, March 7, 2009

General Secretary's Report to the 39th General Assembly

General Secretary’s Report
39th General Assembly
Consortium of Christian Organization for Rural-Urban Development
(CONCORD, Incorporated)
February 17-19, 2009

INTRODUCTION

Delegates representing the member agencies, members of the board of trustees, former CONCORD General Secretary and current Bishop of UCCP, Bishop Benjamin Barloso, colleagues in the secretariat, guests, and fellow partners in development work, good afternoon. My report today, which covers January 2007 to the present, is an account of two important and basic agenda relevant to our assembly. First, this report will present the achievements of our Integrated Development Program In Mindanao-Phase VI ((IDPM VI) implementation and second, this will advance a vision for the sustainability of our consortium based on the internal assessment and the consequent proposals coming from the Member Agencies.

A. INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM IN MINDANAO-PAHSE VI (IDPM VI )

At the onset, let it be reiterated that IDPM VI is a phase-out project of EED-CONCORD. It officially commenced January 2007.. With the extension of three months, it finally ended September 2008. The internal and external audit of the said project was completed in the following month of October. The required reports (3rd Semester and Terminal) were submitted by the secretariat to EED on December 8, 2008.
Despite the lingering problem of poverty, conflict and risk in the whole period, the Board, the Secretariat, the Member Agencies (MA), the Peoples Organizations (PO) and the Networks were able to collectively deliver the programs that impacted much to the lives of all stakeholders.


II. ACCOMPLISHMENTS

The accomplishment level of IDPM VI implementation is basically gauged on the plan of four program components such as Community-Based Development Program (CBDP), Advocacy, Networking and Dialogue Program (ANDP), Institution Building Program (IBP) and Research and Documentation Program (RDP). At the onset, two things must be considered; first, Mindanao Institute failed to implement the program due to legal problem with Agusan District Conference and second, organizing work took-off only at the second semester because the consortium was preoccupied with housekeeping in the earlier period.


Programs Accomplishments
CBDP  133 POs comprising 3,332 members were formed of which 14 were Women POS
 191 MA Education and Trainings conducted
 36 livelihood assistance projects
ANDP  72 for a and Mobilizations attended by 5, 250 individuals
 13 FFM, Relief, Midical Missions
 3 Radio Programs
 25 MAs undertook 62 MA dialogues
 13 SAF livelihood projects with 23 SAF Education and Trainings
 Established relations with 65 networks
IBP  8 IBP trainings
RDP  Published “Kaugmaran” Magazines
 Conducted 2 commissioned researches with In-Peace Mindanao



III. PROGRAM IMPACTS

The women sector, considered as unorganized, unassertive and timid in the previous IDPMs, is impacted much by the current implementation. The 14 women POs organized within the period are unprecedented in terms of number and dynamism. They are able to manage their own livelihood projects and are courageous and articulate advocates on gender, human rights, ecology, IP, Muslim-Christian, tri-people and ecumenical issues and concerns.

Another impact of the whole program can be seen at 18 MAs who have internalized the significance of community work and have opted to continue IDPM implementation even beyond EED funding. They retain and compensate their CDWs through their own resources.

There are emerging attitudes and changed values of stakeholders within the period. Triggered by the economic hardship and conflict, the stakeholders were energized to seriously value collective concerns and actions as oppose to individualism particularly on issues directly affecting their local communities such as extrajudicial killings, development aggression, price hike of basic commodities, militarization, food production, and the likes.

The SAF of Networks and Livelihood projects of MAs spearheaded calls for self-reliant and became venues of criticizing the import-dependent and export-oriented drive of the government .

Advocates from MA on sectoral and development issues, are apparently increasing. For instance, a total of 4 MAs who were reluctant in implementing ANDP programs during the previous IDPM have advocated anti-large scale mining stand, Human Rights, Peace, and justice during the period. A total of 8 MAs, too, broke the walls of exclusivist tendencies and joined hands with local government units/agencies in delivering civic and humanitarian services to the neighborhoods.

Noticeable, too, is the growing knowledge of PO members on simple bookkeeping and the equally important knowledge and skills on managing their PO. All PO leaders are gaining self-confidence on public speaking. Many of them are able and willing to speak in public fora and mobilizations with clear grasp and articulations of the issues at hand. Most remarkable is the impact of ANDP program to network PO members. One PO network member, whose voice and life thundered to the world over is Siche Bustamante-Gandinao. She is a member of Misamis Oriental Farmers Organization, a network PO of CONCORD based in Salay, Misamis Oriental. She heroically gave testimony about the killing of her father-in-law, Dalmacio Gandinao before U.N. Special Representative Philip Alston who visited the country on February 2007. Gandinao’s testimony became one of the solid bases of Alston’s report accusing agents of state behind the extra judicial killings. Siche Gandinao was also extra judicially killed a month after the testimony. But despite that odd, her courage as a woman human rights advocate and a militant PO leader raised the morale of the consortium to implement ANDP with courage. In fact, Central Mindanao Area Conference, a CONCORD MA, extended sanctuary to the Gandinao family for some weeks.
There was also an increasing participation of MAs and POs on multi-sectoral, ecumenical and interfaith activities which eventually bonded alliances with IN-Peace Mindanao, Three Peoples, One against Repression, Aid Watch, Ecumenical Bishops Forum, Union of Peoples Lawyers in Mindanao, SUARA, KALUMARAN, PANALIPDAN-Mindanao, CBHP, etc.
A total of 13 of these networks availed CONCORD’s financial support under Starting Aid Fund (SAF) which impacted on regular consultations, coordinated program implementation and monitoring, and reporting.

MAs’ strengthened partnership with networks is obviously seen in their access to networks’ human resources as lecturers, technicians and program consultants to trainings and fora and as guides and facilitators in MAs’ community integration and contacts.

In addition, MAs have availed network facilities such as video cameras, researches, training materials and modules needed in community development work. In return, Networks also are given access to buildings and other edifices of MAs as venues for meetings and various mobilizations.

The impact that reverberated far and wide to the national and international attention is the legal authority given by the regional trial court of Pagadian city to CONCORD General Secretary as legal custodian of Mr. Ruel Munasque. Ruel is the first beneficiary of the Writ of Amparo in the Philippines. He was a former CDW of DCNM-CONCORD. His release from military detention through the writ positively impacted to the consortium that the Board consequently made a resolution to back up the General Secretary in fulfilling the custodial responsibilities.




B. NEW DIRECTION OF CONCORD BASED ON INTERNAL FINDINGS AND
RECOMMENDATIONS

In light of the new development of our consortium, most remarkably the halt of German funds due to the termination of EED partnership, our 38th General assembly mandated the Board of Trustees to undertake a process of setting the new direction of CONCORD. One of the mechanisms for that process was the conduct on an internal assessment. Such venture was, indeed undertaken right after that assembly and the whole process ends January 2009. The findings and recommendations of the said assessment was duly presented and adopted by the Board of Trustees on 7-8 July 2008 meeting
The consequent study sessions and correspondences to and by MA and cluster levels, forwarded proposals which I will present later on as input to this Assembly .

1. Findings of the Internal Assessments

Generally, the internal assessment findings noted CONCORD’s poor adherence to its Vision, Mission (VMG) and Goals as durable stronghold of the consortium. It pointed out that for 18 years of IDPM program implementations, CONCORD just bonded and worked together as a consortium of accessing funds from its sole partner EZE, turned EED. There is little indication that the true spirit and nature of the consortium enshrined in the VMG been consciously applied in mechanisms such as governance, programs, policies, systems, resourcing, and staffing. Thus the following findings are:

On VMG and core beliefs and principles, the internal assessments noted the following findings:

i. Some MAs have minimal appreciation of the direction of the consortium.
ii. Unity on concrete goals and objectives as set in Strategic Plan are not fully adopted albeit program implementation activities.
iii. Program activities and outputs sometimes do not reflect on the accomplishment of higher goals in terms of avowed or desired changes in beneficiary or their communities.
iv. Oftentimes, only the Community Development Workers (CDW)represent the MAs in activities conducted by CONCORD secretariat Their participation is not complemented on the local MA policy an decision-making units and leadership position.
v. No orientation or implementation guidelines were issued to agency program leaders and managers that resulted to the lack of local policy and other supportive mechanism to expedite the CDWs’ work and the accomplishment of program goals.
vi.
On Governance:

i. Overall, the consortium members appear to have an unequivocal acceptance of the VMG as formulated by CONCORD. This is manifested in GAs and formal documents and there are no strong dissensions on directions. The divergent and sometimes vague applications by various member agencies of the program on components should be noted.
ii. This put into fore key evaluation points. How systematic is the consortium in orienting and ensuring that its vision and mission gets communicated across the member Agencies. How are the goals carried and programmatically transformed into the scale and diverse context of each MAs. How the centrality of the mission and goals is systematically ascertained in the consortium relationship?
iii. This also surfaces the importance of governance Members of the GA and BOT are normally expected to articulate clearly and persuasively the consortium’s mission, beliefs, values, and culture. They should introduce both the process and the substance that could galvanize widespread unity or commitment towards these ends.

On Programs:

i. In general, CONCORD’s development activities have been beneficial to hosts of communities an sectors in the region. The positive results derived from Community Development work where mainly the development efforts of the CDWs. In recent years, visits and inputs of cluster coordinators were helpful as they monitored the gains among the intended beneficiaries
ii. Some CEOs felt that local churches could have participated more actively had the CDWs and cluster coordinators provided more information on plans to be implemented among target groups. This, to some extent, caused confusion and conflict between CDWs abd CEOs.
iii. The IDPM is carried out simply because of the financial package it provided the MAs in terms of personnel salaries (CDWs) and the economic or loan portfolio that comes along in implementing the program.Some MAs have the tendency to attach the IDPM to “usual” administrative units (e.g. finance office, personnel) or as special projects of the MAs.
Furthermore, there is a lack of thoroughness in MAs preparation and analysis of the particular need of the communities and in assessing their readiness and capacity to implement the programs. Sometimes, problems occur with regards to the fit between IDPM and the MA-community’s actual requirements, capabilities, commitment. In such case, the life of the program is only as good as long it is externally subsidized -- sustainability is thus problematic. Sometimes there are more pressing social problems but do not get the necessary program attention or intervention.
iv. The MAs, through the enabling of the CDWs prepared operational plans to guide the implementation of the IDPM.
v. Program implementation was sometimes affected by delayed fund releases from the secretariat. This was based on the system where reports served as the major requirement for release to MAs. That some MAs did not follow the provisions contained in the Memorandum of Agreement was also viewed as one of the major reasons some aspects of the IDPM were not fully implemented.
vi. Some MAs organized the CORD committee, a mechanism composed of CDWs and CEOs to plan and assess the IDPM on a quarterly basis. The committee is tasked to undertake quarterly planning and assessment sessions. Other program-related functions of CDWs include the presentation of outputs and reports to the council, the conference, and where applicable, the Christian Witness and Service. Often only the CDW and CEOs decide how the funds are to be spent.
vii. Some MAs are fortunate to have conference ministers who fully appreciate and support the IDPM program. The extent of their participation in managing and implementation however varies. Some do engage in internal monitoring and feedback on their respective MAs and other would simply provide the moral backing.
viii. Through the years of IDPM, no program management standards and structures have been developed. Neither are periodic program implementation guidelines issued to guide progress and accomplishments.. This lack has left much to the management style of the CEOs, agency heads or incumbents whose terms incongruously expires in two years for the 11 member-agency church conferences,. This is further compounded by the absence of turnover procedures resulting to problems of discontinuity.

On Policies:

i. The board realized that a major policy review is needed. Among those cited were governance policies at the consortium and MA-management scales to include more effective organization structure and processes. Such includes the roles and responsibilities of consortium members, the secretariat and the Board. The criteria, matter and terms of selecting key officers and similarly areas of concerns needing serious consideration.
ii. Most of the policy deliberations were finance-administrative in nature. Specifically these involved overseeing disbursements and budget control, as most of the consortium funds are restricted in nature and earmarked at the start of the three-year project cycle.
iii. They also realized the importance of developing appropriate programs that suits the particular needs, conditions and capacities obtaining in each of the member agency’s context. As such this would require facilitative program standards and support mechanisms.
iv. Program-directional and organization development matters are relatively few and far between in the board agenda or deliberations

On Systems:

i. CONCORD’s IDPM program planning originated as an inductive process where the interested member agencies came up with individual project proposals that were consolidated or integrated into one consortium project submission. On its seconds phase. The Consortium opted to have the Secretariat draft the proposal and forego of the previous bottom-up planning process. The process of “joint-planning” (actually it was unilateral on the part of the Board-Secretariat) was in effect from the Second to the Fourth phases. Phase Five was guided by a 10-year strategic plan (1999-2008). This mode of planning in CONCORD definitely facilitated the funding partnership process in terms of its administrative expediency.
ii. Except for the First Phase, there was neither direct nor substantive participation of the member agencies in the planning process. Their lack of participation in the planning process eventually led to the member-agencies’ diminished role-responsibilities and stakeholder-sense. This is rather contrary to the original consortium spirit of mutual sharing and responsibility on which CONCORD is founded.
iii. The centralization of planning in CONCORD did promote uniformity in implementation standards. However, it missed the specific requirement of the member agencies’ social development context and subjective capacities to respond to their respective situations.
iv. The reporting system was established after the strategic planning session in 1998. Details were established to identify the content and process for utilizing the system prepared through the help of an external consultant. A training activity was conducted to ensure that all member-agencies would be able to effectively implement and systematize the reporting procedure.
v. Despite the introduction of prescribed formats and schedules for reporting, some CDWs were unable to follow the timetable set for the submission of reports. CEOs and CDWs cited the handling of multiple functions as one of the main obstacles why reports were not submitted on time. Changes in staffing also affected the speed and quality in which reports were prepared, thus resulting in delay as request for more data and other clarifications had to be made between the secretariat and the MAs before reports could be finalized.
vi. In general, reports were prepared by CDWs, although other MAs entrusted this function on the CEOs or conference ministers. These documents are then sent to the secretariat as basis for the preparation of reports to EED as its funding partner. CDWs tasked to prepare the reports then forward the documents to the CEO for signing. In cases where the CEOs role has been ministerial, reports somehow do not meet the standards of the donor, a feedback that was raised by the latter during its visits to the consortium. Considering this feedback and the difficulties encountered by the CDWs in the reporting system, some procedures were then modified to enhance the quality of reports.
vii. CONCORD set up a geographic clustering system where MAs meet to facilitate the semestral report-making function, which is tasked upon the Secretariat. The cluster is composed of CDWs located in each geographic area (northwest, eastern, southeast and western). The CEOs attendance in cluster meetings is optional. Technical support is provided by the cluster coordinators hired by the secretariat to guide discussions and meetings assigned to each of the geographic areas. Some of the member-agencies officers however tend to question the role and value of the cluster unit. This comes particularly from agencies that do not agree with CONCORD’s orientation or policies. But the benefit of cluster meetings have been widely acknowledged where knowledge is enhanced, commitment deepened and unity was strengthened. Thus it would be worthwhile to redefine and formalize the cluster the cluster function beyond administrative data gathering and report-making functions. Composition and attendance policies may need to be set.Monitoring and feedbacks can be easily integrated into the activity as a matter of related course. The venue can be utilized to increase learningand exchange value. Peer evaluation and critical feed backing be encouraged.

On resources:

i. The key issue arising from the quality of program implementation is the apparent disconnection between the program goals of the consortium and the program priorities of the MA
ii. EZE (which became merged into EED) has been CONCORD stable and exclusive funding partner for eighteen years. At the time of its exit, CONCORD is said to be EEDs biggest portfolio in the Philippines. Virtually, the funding went comfortably until expectations such as strategic impact and sustainability were sought as marked in the 10-year plan, which commenced with the 1998 strategic planning exercise.
iii. For most MAs, the centrally planned strategic goals were not integrated into respective local development plan, most remained on the level of activity accomplishment and without much qualitative improvements.
iv. Funds allocations to MAs appear to be the main motive for participating in the Consortium and in implementing projects at the community level. To a certain extent, the consortium was often misconstrued as a funding mechanism.

On Staffing:

i. Some CEOs felt that local churches could have participated more actively had the CDW and cluster coordinators provided more information on plans to be implemented among target groups. This, to some extent, caused confusion and conflict between the CDWs and CEOs.
ii. The IDPM is carried out simply because of the financial package it provided the MAs in terms of personnel salaries (CDWs)

2. Recommendations from Internal Assessment

The VMG should become a major governance concern for the General Assembly and Board of Trustees. The substance and processes of articulation should be able to galvanize widespread unity or commitment toward these. The Consortium spirit should be upheld.
i. Devise a system of induction and orientation on CONCORD vision, mission goals for newly elected Board members CDWs, Secretariat officers and staff.
ii. Continuing training and studies for officers and staff to help deepen understanding and building capability in furtherance of task performance.
iii. A system of social accountability and transparency among consortium members especially in regard to joint projects should be promoted. Members should be encouraged to give and receive feedbacks as well as participate in formal evaluations exercises periodically.
iv. Research, Documentation and Publications should be mandated to programmatically respond the learning needs and objectives of the Consortium constituency.

Governance
i. Review of the Constitution and by-laws. Some of the possible areas of concern would be:
• Strengthening the consortium spirit;
• Developing member agency role and responsibilities in the consortium,
• Finding the appropriate consortium governance structure, Board duties and responsibilities
ii. Explore membership expansion and if needed, come up with categories: e.g. charter
members, affiliate members, associate, regular members, at large, or individual to allow for a reasonable and respectable range of commitment & expectations.

Programs

i. Bilateral funding relations for the member agencies must be encouraged, as it will help foster direct accountability and closer transparency values.
ii. Strengthen contracts and agreements regarding project funds and partnerships.
iii. Improve coordination among member- agencies to promote consortium resource-sharing
iv. MAs to formalize joint program planning activities if feasible among themselves.
v. A system of needs identification and analysis should be developed to help MAs in determining what projects will be appropriate and effective locally.
vi. Define advocacy work policies especially with regards to official stands and statements (CONCORD-wide; MA scale, etc)
vii. Develop network-building policy for CONCORD and its MAs
viii. Forge agreement regarding participation of, and networking among MAs (external and intra-MAs)
ix. Plan relevant courses to enhance the capacities of MA in implementing programs for the different sectors. This should be done after training needs have been analyzed.
x. Need to explore policies and guidelines in having more engagements with local government units as well as other local leadership structures.
xi. Strengthen lines of communication and information that reaches each of the member agencies.
xii. A planning, monitoring and evaluation system should be regularized.

Policies
i. Review and define policy areas (finance, personnel, program, networking, external relations, and so on) to be covered by the respective consortium units. (e.g., Board, General Assembly, Secretariat, Member agencies, CORD, if any.
ii. Review, amend or come up with relevant policies, i.e. qualifications of BOT and General Secretary; selection of project areas
Systems
i. Review and analyze bottlenecks in the system to ensure effectiveness and proper documentation of project results and impact
ii. Develop system to facilitate data-collection and quality of outputs
iii. Training on monitoring and evaluation
Resources
i. Set organizational sustainability and institutional strengthening objectives.
ii. Have an inventory of the tangible & intangible assets of member agencies.
iii. MAs to develop plan for resource generation and sustainability and assist POs how to mobilize resources at local level
Staffing
In future Secretariat-MA joint implementation schemes, define administrative and functional accountabilities and supervision of the CDWs and the roles of the Secretariat and the Conferences respectively in both regards.

PROPOSALS FOR THE 39TH GENERAL ASSEMBLY BASED ON THE FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS OF INTERNAL ASSESSMENT AND THE CONSEQUENT MA’s DEVELOPMENT AND RESOURCE GENERATION PLAN AND CLUSTER DISCUSSION SESSIONS

1. To adopt the findings and recommendations of the 2008 internal assessment.
2. To form a task force that would conceptualized and submit project proposals to new funding partners.
3. To create a 3-member Education Committee tasked to devise a system of induction and orientation on CONCORD vision, mission, goals for newly elected Board members, CDWs, Secretariat Officers and Staff, and MA council members
4. To create a 3-member Constitutional Review Committee who is tasked to review the Constitution and by-laws covering areas such as 1) Strengthening the consortium spirit, 2) Developing member agency role and responsibilities in the consortium, and Finding appropriate consortium governance structure, Board duties and responsibilities.
5. To require MAs to submit a community Development and Resource Generation Plan
6. To request MAs to defray 40% of CONCORD 2009 budget.
7. To require Member Agencies to institutionalize CONCORD program by taking care of CDW‘s salary, and by attending to the responsibility of setting and implementing sustainability programs on existing Cooperatives, Peoples Organizations and Networks organized under the previous IDPM..
8. To subject all MAs to an inventory of CONCORD Assets, Cooperatives, and Peoples Organizations at their respective areas.

D. CONCLUSION

There is a saying which goes “we don’t have responsibility to finish our work but we are not at liberty to quit.” Indeed, IDPM VI, the last phase of EED program, did not finish the work of CONCORD. A lot more jobs hang on the line as EED bid its final goodbye. Yes, it is true that great things have already been accomplished after six phases of IDPM. CONCORD has solidified her 26 MAs and have helped empowered the three peoples of Mindanao (Christian settlers, Bangsamoro, and IP) for economic development and self-determination. It did great achievements in the advocacy work for justice, peace and the care of the environment. But, generally, its accomplishment remains a foretaste. CONCORD is still far from being truly a consortium for development of communities. The envisioned society where justice, unity and love reign supreme, where people are empowered and free to determine their future and where God’s creation is responsibly managed is yet to be fully realized. Ironically, these development agenda are becoming more elusive and vague at this point of time where, individualism, poverty and unpeace dominates the landscape of Mindanao and the whole country Thus, as a consortium of MAs, POs and Networks, CONCORD is not at liberty to quit the job it has started and committed to. The imperative of her vision, mission, and goals to answer the Mindanao problem drives her to continue with new resolve.


Prepared by:

REV. BELTRAN E. PACATANG
CONCORD, General Secretary

02/17/09

Note: Recommendation after commented and approved by 39th GA

1. To adopt the findings and recommendations of the 2008 internal assessment.
2. To form a task force that would conceptualized and submit project proposals to new funding partners.
3. To create a 3-member Education Committee tasked to devise a system of induction and orientation on CONCORD vision, mission, goals for newly elected Board members, CDWs, Secretariat Officers and Staff, and MA council members
4. To create a 3-member Constitutional Review Committee who is tasked to review the Constitution and by-laws covering areas such as 1) Strengthening the consortium spirit, 2) Developing member agency role and responsibilities in the consortium, and Finding appropriate consortium governance structure, Board duties and responsibilities.
5. To request MAs to submit a community Development and Resource Generation Plan
6. To request MAs to defray 40% of CONCORD 2009 budget.
7. As a matter of principle, requesting Member Agencies to institutionalize their CONCORD program by taking care of the necessary needs for the sustainability.
8. To request all MAs to submit an inventory of CONCORD Assets, Cooperatives, and Peoples Organizations and scholars at their respective areas.

Wednesday, September 3, 2008

EDD Appeals for Peace Process


The German Action Network Human Rights – Philippines, comprising of the church-led development organisations Bread for the World/Diakonie, Church Development Service (EED), Misereor, Missio, United Evangelical Mission (UEM) and of philippinenbüro in Asia House, would like to express its serious concern regarding the current conflict in central Mindanao. Due to the recent outbreak of war in Mindanao more than 70,000 people have become internally displaced and now rely on humanitarian aid and on the conflicting parties to stop fighting.

We would like to appeal to all actors in the conflict, the MILF, the Government of the Republic of the Philippines (GRP) as well as local politicians and other armed groups to refrain from the use of violent force and adhere to the agreed peace process.

The Temporary Restraining Order (TRO) recently issued by the Supreme Court has stalled the signing of the Memorandum of Agreement on Ancestral Domain (MOA). While we consider this a major setback in the quest for peace, we believe that the Supreme Court shouldn’t allow itself to become a stumbling block in resolving a political conflict that requires a political solution. We therefore appeal to the Supreme Court to lift the TRO and allow the peace process to move forward.

There is a need for continued consultation, transparent dialogue and information on the MOA, not only in Mindanao, but in all of the Philippines. The MOA is the result of 110 consultative sessions between the MILF and the GRP since 2004. It embodies important aspirations of the Bangsamoro struggle, such as the right to self-determination as well as the commitment of the government to address the historic inequalities at the root of the conflict.

It is vital that these aspirations will not be used for any other agenda and that the accomplishments of the peace process will be honoured. Particularly those politicians who may feel threatened by the changes the MOA will bring about should be reminded of the fundamental right to self-determination of the Bangsamoro people as recognized under international law. The GRP should clearly intervene here to prevent further escalation. Inflammatory propaganda and militarization on behalf of those who may loose from the MOA

must not poison the relationship between the people of Mindanao. With regard to current discussions on a charter change in connection to the MOA, we would like to point out that while there will indeed be a need for comprehensive legislative action with the signing of the MOA,
it is premature to pursue these changes before the presidential election in 2010. According to the timeframe of the MOA it will take the parties twelve (12) months after the signing to proceed with the plebiscite and a total of fifteen (15) months to complete the negotiations and resolve all outstanding issues on the Comprehensive Compact. Given this timeframe there won’t be enough time to undertake charter changes via the GRP-MILF talks.

We appeal to all actors in the conflict to listen to the peaceful voices of the civilians and refugees in Mindanao – the Bangsamoro people, indigenous people and migrant settlers alike and to address the grievances at the root of the conflict.

Kind Regards,

Dr. Karl Schoenberg (SGD)
(Chairman)

c/o philippinenbüro e.V. im Asienhaus
Bullmannaue 11
D-45327 Essen
Action Network Human Rights - Philippines
Telefon
0049 [201] 830 38 28
Fax
0049 [201] 830 38 30
e-Mail
philippinenbuero@asienhaus.de

CONCORD, Inc Appeals for Peace Process

CONSORTIUM OF CHRISTIAN ORGANIZATION FOR RURAL-URBAN DEVELOPMENT (CONCORD, Inc. )
Zone 6, Marfil Subdivision, Barra, Opol, Misamis Oriental
27 August 2008
CONCORD, Inc. Appeals for Peace Process
The Consortium of Christian Organization for Rural-Urban Development (CONCORD, Inc.), a community development arm of protestant churches in Mindanao such as the United Church of Christ in the Philippines (UCCP), the United Methodist Church, Episcopal Church of Southern Philippines and Alliance Church, would like to register our stern condemnation on the recent hostilities against civilians in Cotabato, Maguindanao and Lanao provinces perpetuated and aggravated by the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) and the military and police forces of the Government.
Last August 18, MILF fighters, led by Commander Abdullah Macapaar alyas Bravo, raided Kolambogan and Kauswagan towns of Lanao del Norte killing 28 civilians.
Five UCCP-CONCORD members in Libertad, Kauswagan were looted and killed namely Miguel Daitia, 95 years old, Aldren Tan, 55, Gilbert Labid, 21, Jabez Ganzan, 38, and Ruben Daitia, 27. Their homes were burned down and around Php 500,000.00 are robbed from Aldren Tan.
Christian Young Adult Chairperson of UCCP, Kauswagan, said the military and police elements present during the raid did not fire a single shot to protect the civilians from carnage. He claimed that reported exchanges of fire between MILF raiders and the government forces during the pillage is a great military lie. This same thing happens in Kolambugan. The military was not there to protect the civilian from the looters. The 3 soldiers and one policeman killed at Kolambugan are victims of the raider’s shots.
The number of evacuees is estimated at around ten (10) thousand of which 6, 347 are temporary sheltered at the mosque in Lanao Areas. The rest evacuated to Misamis Occidental Province , particularly at evacuation centers and relatives in Ozamis City , Tangub and Clarin. In Iligan City , the capital of the province, two hotels were bombed.
As of date, Kauswagan and Kolambogan centers remain “ghost towns”- shops, offices, schools are closed. The remaining farmers in Kauswagan and Kolambogan visit their homes, live stocks and farms only during the day but at night they stay at their relatives’ homes near the seashore.
On the other hand, late July until early part of this month, MILF forces, directed by 105th Based Commander Ameril Umbra Kato occupied 15 villages of Aleosan and Pikit municipalities and engaged a military offensive against the Government forces for three weeks before their main force withdraw to Maguidanao areas. Destruction of lives and properties is mounting caused by the MILF occupation and the eventual military take-over. The National Disaster Coordinating Council , Social Welfare Department and Philippine Military reported an initial assessment to 159,123 evacuees in 56 villages sheltered at 53 evacuation centers, and undetermined civilian deaths, burned-out homes and farms .
The Conference Minister of UCCP-Cotabato Annual Conference, Rev. Pablo de la Cruz, Jr. reported that, thousands of CONCORD members are displaced of their homes and livelihood due to the fighting.Reports said these hostilities are caused by the Supreme Court’s decision to stop the signing of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) on ancestral domain between the government and the Muslim rebel group.CONCORD, having advocacy on ancestral domain and Christian-Muslim- Indigenous Peoples dialogue and genuine development , call on the Supreme court to lift the Termporary Restraining Order filed and supported by traditional politicians and big land lords in Mindanao such as Pinol, Mar Roxas, Lobregat, and the likes, and allow the process of resolving this issue to go on.
We, particularly call on the Department of Internal and Local Government (DILG) to stop arming civilians for military purposes. CONCORD receives report from Rev. Jemwel Belza of UCCP, Kolambogan, that last August 20, the DILG, headed by Secretary Ronaldo Puno, visited Kolambugan town and distributed shotguns to Christian civilians to fight the MILF. Likewise the MILF are recruiting civilians for military build-up. There are reports that MILF raiders at Lanao areas, who eventually surrendered to the government a day after the incident, are recruits from Higaonon Tribe of Rogongon, Iligan City . One of the raiders is a son of Rogongon Barangay Captain.
The whole citizenry concerned must take measures to prevent the resurrection of dreaded fanatical groups “ILAGA” of the Christians and “Barakoda” of the Muslims. These groups wrecked havoc to lives and properties in the 70’s and 80’s and heightened the religious rift of each adherents.

Seeing the urgency of the situation, we appeal immediate relief assistance from the Government and the MILF for the bereaved families of the deceased and the evacuees.
And visioning the realization of a long and lasting peace for Mindanao and the whole country, we call on both parties, who have undergone a tedious 110 consultative sessions relative to the MOA, to continue seeking peace on the table instead at the firing line

Urgently Calling,

REV. BELTRAN E. PACATANG (SGD)
General Secretary
CONCORD, Inc.

cc:
President Gloria macapagal-Arroyo
Office of the President, Malakanyang

JESUS G. DUREZA
Office of the Press Secretary
3rd Floor, New Executive BuildingMalacañang, Manila 1005Voice:+63 (2) 734-5259Fax:+63 (2) 735-6167

RONALDO PUNO
Secretary for Interior and Local Government
Francisco Condominium IIEDSA cor. Mapagmahal St.Diliman, Quezon City925-0330; 925-0332 F

DR. ESPERANZA CABRAL
Secretary for Social Welfare & Development
Batasang Pambansa ComplexQuezon City931-7916; 931-8068; 931-8191 F
eicabral@dswd. gov.ph www.dswd.gov.

General Hermogenes Esperon
Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process
7th Floor Agustin Building IEmerald AvenuePasig City 1605 Voice:+63 (2) 636 0701 to 066Fax:+63 (2) 635 9579

NAZRULLAH B. MANZUR
Executive Director A R M M SOCIAL FUND3/F VHW (Land Bank) Bldg., Veterans Ave., Zamboanga City(062) 992-2679; 991-9410 F

GILBERT TEODORO
Secretary for National Defense
Room 301, DND BuildingCamp Aguinaldo , Quezon City911-0488; 911-1746; 911-6213 F

RONALDO PUNO
Secretary for Interior and Local Government
Francisco Condominium IIEDSA cor. Mapagmahal St.Diliman, Quezon City925-0330; 925-0332 F

et al...

JESUS G. DUREZAOffice of the Press Secretary3rd Floor, New Executive BuildingMalacañang, Manila 1005Voice:+63 (2) 734-5259

Monday, July 28, 2008

Scholarship Proposal

CONSORTIUM OF CHRISTIAN ORGANIZATION FOR RURAL-URBAN
DEVELOPMENT (CONCORD), Inc.
Zone 6, Barra Opol, Misamis Oriental
PHILIPPINES



A Project Proposal


i. IDENTIFYING INFORMATION


Project Title Scholarship for Education and Development of
Communities ( SEDEC ) II

Project Proponent CONCORD Incorporated
Zone 6 Barra, Opol, Misamis Oriental
PHILIPPINES
C/o Rev. Beltran Pacatang
General Secretary

Duration of the Project Six (6) Calendar School Years Beginning in SY 2008-2009

Total Project Cost Php 68,648,380.00

Local Counterpart Php 14,399,076.00

Requested Fund Php 54,249,304.00

Nature of Assistance Grant


BACKGROUND OF CONCORD SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM

The scholarship program of the Consortium evolved from the staff development programs in its early years in the 1980`s . Needing to improve the skills and capacity of the early staff, selected personnel underwent training and formal education. The governing board played a major role in the screening process. By 1984 a partnership with the Ecumenical Scholarship Program of Germany established, the program was expanded into the Scholarship for Poor and Deserving Students (SPADES) with the sole aim of supporting college education. In 1995 it was renamed as Deserving But Poor ( DBP) Scholarship Program but with the same rationale and objectives.

Due to some feedbacks regarding the DBP program implementation, an evaluation was initiated in 1999. The major recommendation of this evaluation study was to reiterate that the program was intended to support the human resource development programs of its member agencies and the broader communities of the consortium served. It also emphasized that the consortium need to continuously guide and assist the scholars according to its orientation and philosophy, the CONCORD should pursue continuing extra-curricular programs that will impart its pro-people, patriotic and God-fearing values, attitudes and commitment on the scholars, according to the October 1999 final report. The extra curricular program was to ran parallel to the formal scholarship program before, during and after the formal scholarship periods. Hence, in October 1999, the DBP became the Scholarship for Education and Development of Communities (SEDEC).

In 2000, SEDEC was implemented until 2006. Based on the latest report to the CONCORD General assembly in February 2007 and Committee meetings much remains to be desired in the program implementation. It was even difficult to determine if the 1999 evaluation recommendations were achieved or even implemented. As a matter of fact, some of the scholars for one reason or the other were still studying as of the lat report well beyond the 4-year prescribed period, others dropped out from the schools and less than 30 % were absorbed by the member agencies.

It is therefore the goal of this SEDEC II to implement the 1999 recommendations with more intent and purpose. Hence, an implementation mechanism will be followed integrating the scholarship program with the existing organizational set-up of the consortium. A conscientious, diligent and deliberate promotion of concepts, principles and transparent organization policies at all levels and periods of the program implementation shall be ensured. The program is extended for six years because of the lessons learned during the SEDEC I implementation.

OBJECTIVES

General Objectives

Develop a human resource pool of properly oriented and committed individuals; a leadership pool composed by professionally and academically qualified personnel

Specific Objectives

Determine the human resources development needs of availing member agencies and peoples` organizations especially those participating in this program;
Design and install organizational management mechanisms at the CONCORD governing body level to ensure program oversight and directions;
To hold a program at the CONCORD level for the continuing education of the scholars covering the pre-schooling, during the schooling and post schooling periods;
Attend to the welfare of the scholars in cooperation with the member agencies, peoples` organizations and families;
Assist scholars with potentials who have dropped out from schooling for justifiable reasons.

SEDEC II BENEFICIARIES

A maximum of 5 candidates per member agency will be accepted or a total of 145 scholars for 29 member agencies. The scholarship program will be intended for graduate, college and technical courses levels. Every MAs and its peoples` organization could avail the scholarship support program depending on the determination of their human resources needs.
The candidates for scholarship must be poor but deserving active member of the church, community organization or networks and MAs personnel which are part of their staff development program or developed to become MAs future administrators or leader.

The process of determination of such needs and screening requirements shall be determined by the CONCORD Board of Trustees in consultation with the member agencies and peoples` organizations.

Policies covering the program shall be inclusive of past applicable policies and principles cited below. Patronage will be disallowed and the candidate and the member agency, peoples` organization or families shall be required to shoulder a counterpart based on respective capacities.

The maximum number of five (5) candidates per member agency and PO ma not be actually filled up depending on an appraisal of the human resources development plan and actual needs of the availing organization or institution. Such decision could be reached in a collegial discussion between the CONCORD Board of Trustees and the concerned member agency or peoples` organization.

PRINCIPLES

People are the prime movers for change not the technology or tools which are instruments to serve human needs;
Human resources must be pro-people, patriotic and God-fearing;
Human resources have passion for truth, justice and freedom;
Education brings about life, not the degree obtained
Students should enroll or study in school and colleges that sustain an academic environment which promotes social development;
Gender sensitivity and poverty alleviation;
Serving local communities and those in need;
Preference for learning institutions which are near their residence;
Non-theological courses- science and mathematics;
No bias/ prejudice- race, religion, political, creed, dropouts, scholastic performance, etc;
Principles of consortium support for one another; weak MAs priority, strong MAs to give way or support weaker MAs.

SEDEC II FRAMEWORK

The preliminary phase of the program would include:
· The selection of candidate-scholars by the member agencies and peoples` organizations.
· The information should be properly disseminated within the organization.
· The program committee shall receive them and process the application based on its institutional processes and needs.
· The candidate scholar should be fully aware about the objectives, principles and requirements of the program.
· The final action of the MA would come in the form of a recommendation to the Scholarship Committee of the CONCORD BOT. The later will process the screening and request for other requirements.
With the selection of the candidate, the scholar will be required to join a community immersion and learning programs and the duration to be determined by the CONCORD program. The process should include a written self-appraisal by the prospective as well as an appraisal by the hosting community. The documents shall be included in the candidate appraisal. This will be processed collegially among the candidate-scholars to be facilitated by the Cluster Coordinator. The latter will prepare a summary report on the candidates` attitudes and aptitude which shall form part of the candidates` individual life.

During the actual schooling process, the student shall provide the area cluster coordinator the semestral class schedules and other needs covered by the budget of this program. The student shall be visited by the area coordinators as well as the organization or family or MA as part of the regular visits.

Scholastic performance such as grades, participation of in-campus student activities, violations of campus rules shall be requested from school authorities, etc. The student-scholar will be asked to make an annual report to the MA, PO and CONCORD exclusive of his/ her academic performance. Such individual performance shall be kept with the personal file at the CONCORD office.

In-between extended long school breaks or when the area cluster coordinator deems that the scholars can convene or even tap them individually for some activities without affecting their academic attendance, such should be programmed. A fellowship or alumni association maybe even considered to instill a sense of camaraderie and companionship among themselves.

A post graduation activity sustaining the the level of fellowship and communication among the graduates will be the responsibility of the CONCORD secretariat. Follow ups through retreat processes or other forms should be encouraged.

Hence, no secretariat will be hired or appointed. The monitoring and follow ups of the scholars will be a part and parcel of CDW and area cluster coordinator’s responsibilities. Budget in the draft for personnel will be used to implement the parallel, extra-curricular program of CONCORD. The amount should be supplemented with other sources from the regular programs of the CONCORD Secretariat.

VI. The implementing Structure

The CONCORD General Assembly


Board of Trustees
Executive Committee

Scholarship Committee

MAs CORD or Task Force

Area Cluster Coordinator -------------------- Community Development Worker

Role and Functions:

CONCORD Board of Trustees/ Executive Committee

a) Set directions of the scholarship program.
b) Approves policies covering the implementation of the Scholarship Program.
c) Acts on recommendations forwarded the the Scholarship Committee.
d) Makes final approval on all candidates to the program
e) With schools, colleges and universities.


Scholarship Committee
a) Collates and consolidates all existing policies related to the
implementation of the Scholarship Program.
b) Receives and study the list of candidate-scholars as to
compliance with set requirements and human resources need(s) of the member agency, peoples’ organization, families. (for BOT approval)
c) Draft policies and/or revise existing ones that have an
effect on the scholarship Program. ( for BOT approval)
` d) Draft a list of accredited schools, colleges and universities.
d) Study and monitor the complimentary extra-curricular
program of the CONCORD Secretariat for the scholars.
e) Receives progress reports from the scholars and the
CONCORD secretariat on the development updates.


Member Agencies, Peoples” Organizations (its committees, governing bodies, CDWs
a) Submission of Human Resource Development Plan of
manpower Plan.
b) Selection and initial processing of candidate-scholar(s)
According to each MAs stipulated processes.
c) Submission of format of MOA or covenant exclusive of terms of
covering academic requirements, responsibilities of the candidates, before, during and after schooling period. Commitment of counterpart shall be included in the MOA or covenant.
c) Provide regular update report to the CONCORD Board of
Trustees thru the Office of the General Secretary.

CONCORD Secretariat
a) Assists the MAs and Peoples’ organization in providing
orientation on the scholarship Program within their
respective area of responsibility
b) Assists in the processing of candidate-scholars at the MA
And/or peoples’ organization levels.
c) Draft an extra-curricular program for the scholars before,
during, and after the schooling period for submission to the Scholarship Committee.
d) Prepares a progress report on the status and welfare of the
scholars with recommendations.
e) Prepare a collated semestral and annual reports to the
Scholarship Committee and BOT before submission to ESP Germany
f) Establish a working relations with the accredited schools,
colleges and universities.
g) Performs other tasks related to the program
implementation as requested by the CONCORD BOT.



VII. Budget

Sunday, July 27, 2008

The State of CONCORD

The State of our Consortium

(Presented to the 38th GA, February 12-14, 2008)

“Examining the Present”

A. Introduction

Mr. Chairman, Delegates, Board of Trustees, Resource Speakers, Guests, Observers, good afternoon.
Yesterday’s presentation reminded us of the lessons from the past. Today let me invite you to examine the present state of CONCORD.

Let us look at our present, first, by describing the self-identity of our consortium vis-à-vis commitments and performance in program implementation. Thus, along this line, we shall be discussing MA’s development work expressions in light of cooperation/coordination so that analyses and recommendations can be made for a more workable consortium ahead.

Secondly, the presentation of our state endeavors to present an update of our program implementation particularly Integrated Development Program in Mindanao (IDPM) focusing on its phase VI components like Advocacy, Networking and Dialogue Program (ANDP), Research and Documentation Program (RDP), Institution Building Program (IBP) and Community-Based Development Program (CBDP).

On the other hand, the state of our consortium will show us the status of our finance. At his point, the Treasurer will help in giving us idea of our financial status and the Comptroller will show to us our internal audit findings and present to us plan and budget.

Furthermore this presentation of our state undertakes discussion on the observations on structure of our consortium which heavily influenced the collective and coordinated implementation of some program priorities

Finally, recommendations will be made for policy action and implementation

B. OUR BEING

Our consortium is a composition of 28 Member Agencies (MAs) categorized into 3 as Conferences, Development Service Agencies (DSA) and Church Related Institutions (CRI). The 28 MAs are spread through Mindanao and Cebu in the Visayas Islands. The following graph shows our basic profile:



CONFERENCES (12 Conferences, 12 CEO & 22 CDWs)

CONFERENCES
ADDRESS
CEO
CDW
1. DCNM
Oroquita City
Rev. A. Saycon
R. Caling
R. Caroro
2. WMC
Pagadian City
Rev. Eric Calgas
Nina Suson
Bethel
3. DCNZ
Sindangan, ZN
Rev. F. Dumaog
B. Gomez
W. Duhaylungsod
4. CMAC
Cagayan de Oro Cty
Rev. M. Labuntog
Ms. L. Liwat
Sanny Boy Limbag
5. LDC
Iligan City
Rev. C. Iglupas
Ms. L. dela Pena
6. ADC
Butuan City
Rev. M. Calawigan
Rev. Jessie Pagalan
Rev. Lydia Balacuit
7. SDC
Surigao City
Rev. J. Bagnol
Rev. Pio Mercado
Samuel Salubre
8. NDDC
Tagum City
Rev. R. Janoras
C. Agustin
T. Crospero
9. SMDC
Davao City
Rev. W. Bongado
P. Booc
A. de la Rosa
10. SCSDC
Gen. Santos City
Rev. M.Rezane
Mr. E. Amoro
Rev. M. Capitle
11. CAC
Midsayap
Rev. P. de la Cruz,Jr
Ms. M. Salem
Rev. B. Domingo
12. DCSZ
Makilas, Ipil
Rev. P. Bagalanon
None


DEVELOPMENT SERVICE AGENCIES (8 DSAs, 8 CEOs,13 CDWs)

NAME OF AGENCIES
ADDRESS
CEO
CDW
1. IN-A-PEACE
Zamboanga City
Mrs. E. Francisco
Ms. S. Lee
Ms. A. Jumalon
2. UMC-BCS
Kabacan
Rev. M. Rapisura
Ptr. R. Dungao
Rev. E. Jacinto
3. EDSP
Cotabato City
Bp. D. Bustamante/Mr. Sergio Bacas
Mr. P. Pinera
Mr. G. Casimina
4. PLASMA
Magsaysay, DS
Mr. B. Narvasa
Pstr. E. Ovalo
Mr. B. Sanggay
5. MCSF
Gen. Santos City
Rev. Gil Almarez
Rev. M. Rezane
Mr. J. Legaria
6. BRENT
HOSPITAL
Zamboanga City
Eng. V. Anaud
Mr. N. Oroc
Mr. G. Sardenia
7. VCMC
Cebu City
Rev. M. Camba
Mr. B. Rosales
8. BIHMI
Davao city
Rev. R. dela Cruz


CHURCH-RELATED INSTITUTION (CRI) 8 CRIs, 8CEOs, 6 CDWs)

NAME OF ANGENCIES
ADDRESS
CEO
CDW
1. GICC
Gingoog City
Mr. R. Alegado
Ms. M. Sepe
2. PILGRIMS
Cagayan de Oro
Dr. R. Almirante
Mr. D. Dumagat
3. Brokenshire
College
Davao City
Rev. L. Naive
Ms. Jo-anne Charry Campo
4. FI
Bonifacio, M.O
Mr. R. Jalalon
Mr. R. Silvano
5. JBI
Jimenez, M.O
Ms. L. Sabacahan
Ms. K. Sardenia
6. DCFI
Marawi City
Dr. F. Tawagon
Ms. J. Carim
7. SCC
Midsayap
Dr. M. Aoanan

8. MI
Cabadbaran City



All in all, we are a consortium of 28 Member Agencies run by 28 MA’s Chief Executive Officers, and 51 CDWs.

Of these MAs, BHIMI and SCC established bilateral relations with EED thus; their participation in the IDPM VI was not deemed necessary.

Because of some problems with ADC, Mindanao Institute’s (MI) participation with IDPM VI was deferred.

Furthermore, we are coordinated and guided by a 10-member secretariat and a 9-Member Board of Trustees illustrated in the following chart:

SECRETARIAT

NAMES
POSITION
CONTACT #
1. Rev. Beltran E. Pacatang
General Secretary
0910-5366085
2. Ms. Marley Prado-Reyes
Treasurer
09053121028
3. Mr. Marvin Daul
Comptroller
09202765218
4. Ms. Erika Sanchez
Bookkeeper
09183114892
5. Mr. Armando Naul
Program Coordinator-ANP
09063477125
6. Mr. Leonardo Vicente Corrales
IMO
09277165105
7. Pr. Amancio Benigian
Program Coordinator-IBP
09177880650
8. Mr. Elmer Sagbigsal
Program Coordinator-CBDP
09156875748
9. Rev. Cromwell Esteban Rabaya II
Program Coordinator-RDP
09283149778
10. Mr. Franscisco Arguelles
Office Secretary
09204259301


BOARD OF TRUSTEES (2007 – 2009)

NAMES
POSITION
CONTACT #
1. REV. MELZAR LABUNTOG
Corporate President
088-856-2481
2. REV. MANUEL RAPISURA
Corporate Vice-President
064-228-5131
3. MS. LEILANEEH SABACAHAN
Corporate Secretary
088-272-3336
4. REV. MARILOU REZANE
Member
083-302-4046
5. REV. ELIAQUIM DE AQUINO
Member
0921-450-62-46
6. MR. SERGIO BACAS
Member
Tel. 064-421-29-60
Fax. 064-421-17031
7. REV. RUBEN BALONGA
Member
Tel. 72-44-98
Fax. 088-856-4232
8. REV. RUTH JANORAS
Member
084-217-2303
9. DR. ALEXIS MONTES
Member
Tel. 032-253-3848
Fax. 032-253-3025


C. PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION: IDPM VI

The banner program of our consortium is the Integrated Development in Program in Mindanao (IDPM). We are now in the 6th phase of our implementation and is ending on June 2008. The presentation of our IDPM VI status covers the period January 2007-December 2007.
At the outset, let me reiterate that our IDPM VI program implementation fully commence only at the latter part of the first quarter. On January to February 2007 we were pre-occupied with housekeeping concerns.

C.1. ANDP

Our IDPM VI has four (4) basic components. These components are the Community-Based Development Program (CBDP), Institution Building Program (IBP), Advocacy, Networking and Dialogue Program (ANDP), and Research and Documentation Program(RDP).

Let me, first, share the status of our banner component which is Advocacy, Networking and Dialogue Program. ANDP has two (2) goals:
Goal 1 : To strengthen and expand coordination among Member Agencies with other development organization in work towards Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation (JPIC)
Goal 2 : Greater Christian Moro-Lumad coordination & dialogue by supporting the establishment and strengthening of Moro and Lumad Peoples` self- organization
Goal 3: Enhanced capability of Member Agencies to address Gender and
Development issues and concerns
The Specific objective of ANDP includes:
Unification of understanding on the implementation structure of IDPM VI & reaffirmation of commitment of 28 MAs to undertake the same purpose

To promote harmony & unity through comprehensive understanding of different creed/ culture & tradition/ ideals & gender

To give a united voice of the poor, deprived, oppressed, exploited and struggling sectors

To place the poor, deprived, oppressed, exploited and struggling sectors in the forefront in addressing core issues affecting the access and control of resources


To capacitate POs to articulate and discuss pressing issues and work for their resolution

To raise public awareness on pressing issues and concerns affecting them

Our MA initiated ANDP Activities

Each Member Agency of our consortium has to initiate, at least nine (9) ANDP activities for the whole period of IDPM VI. Thus, our consortium’s minimum target is the sum total of 9 activities times 26 MAs which is equal to 234 activities. Let us illustrate our performance through the following diagram:

MAs
1st Semester Education
No. Educ
2nd Semester Education
No. Educ
Total
a. Conferences




1. DCNZ
None
0
Orientation/ dialogue, IP women
2
2
2. DCNM
Voters educ
1
Advocacy, Theological –HSA, IDPM orientation
5
6
3. WMC
None
0
HSA, HR, week of peace, pol dets, leadership, health
7
7
4. CMAC
MA & Network Or
2
Sectoral, HR,Mobiliz, Theol.Forum
4
7
5. LDC
Gender forum
1
Forum- HSA
3
4
6. ADC
None
0
IDPM orientation/ dialogue, OPH forum
8
8
7. SDC
None
0
?


8. NDDC
None
0
HSA, PO leaders consul, IDPM 6 orientation
5
5
9. SMDC
None
0
None
0
0
10. SCSDC
None
0
Sectoral issues, dev Ag, tri-people dialogue, MA dialogue, interfaith on HAS, Duyog-Ramadahn, LGU Lobbying, 2 Mobiliz
9
9
11. CAC
Voters educ
1
2 MA level dialogue, Dev Ag, Convenor on Peace, HR Mobilz
5
6
Sub Total
5

46
49
b. Devt Service Agency




1. In-A-Peace
PO orientation, team building
2
Finance mgt, livelihood trng
2
4
2. EDSP
Participatory Rural appraisal
2
Local Governace, Mobilz (Bike 4 peace), Interfaith Dialogue
3
5
3. PLASMA
Kapunungan sa Katawhan
1
MA Dialogue, Mobilz, Interfaith HS
3
4
4. UMC-BCS
Leadership
2
Ecology, Dev. Ag., Pol Prisoners Day 59th HR day, VAWC
5
7
5. MCSF
None
0
Leadership trng, Joint MA interfaith on HSA, LMC Dialogoe, Oil Price, JPEPA, Mining, Para-Legal, Mobiliz
8
8
6. VCMC
None
0
Forum on Urban poor issues
2
2
7. Brokenshire
None
0
VAWC (4), HR (2) Environment (2), midlife crisis ( 1)
7
7
8. Brent
Voters Education
1
None
0
1
Sub total
8

30
38
c. Church Related Institution




1. FI
PMES
1
None
0
1
2. GICC
Care & Management of Large cattle
1
?
0
0
3. PILGRIM
None
0
?

?
4. DCFI
None
0
?


5. JBI
Organizational Management
1
None
0
1
Sub total
3

0
3
Total
16

76
92

Based on the target of 234, we were able to implement 92 activities which put our MA’s performance level to 39.31%.




2. NETWORK Initiated Education/Training

NETWORKS
ACTIVITY
PLACE
DATE
1.UNIDA-STAREX (transport)
Electoral forum
CDO
April 29
2. KASIMBAYAN
Voters educ
UCCP-Iponan, Mis.Or
March 20
3. NMLACER (transport)
Electoral & voters educ
CDO
MAY 4
4. SGS (Lumad)
Health forum
Josefina, ZDS
April 24
5. ZNPAAM
Forum on….. & Against Destructive Mining
St. Vincent College, Dipolog city
April 24
6. ENV. & MINING WATCH
Forum on Environment Protection
Siocon, ZDN
March 14
7. PROTECT-WMR
Forum on Mining Issues

WMC Conference hall
March 10
8. WOPAD (women)
Seminar… on Gender & Dev., and Budget Processing
Kawit, Pagadian city
April 25
9. KADAIT, INC
Voter’s educ
Ozamis city

10. MinPAC UMC
Three People, One Against Repression Socsargen Forum (InPeace Socsargen Assembly)

April 28
11. SOCSARGENEC
Voter ed
IFI, Polomolok
April 16
12. CAUSE-DS
Electoral forum
Digos
April 6 – 8
13. NLDFI
Workers ed
Marsman, Sto. Tomas, DN
May 28
14. SAGIP
Solidarity conference
HARAN, DC
June 16
15. LKM (moro)
Interfaith prayer-rally
Freedom Park, DC
March 18
16. PEOPLE’S NET
Candidates forum & Kontra-daya launching

March 19 & April 13
17. NCCP-ZamBaREC
Interfaith forum
WIMSU, ZC
Sept 11
18. CBHS-ZN
Medical Assistance for Leprosy…
Brgy. Ventura, Sapang Dalaga, Mis Occ

19. KARAPATAN – WMR
FFM
Western Mindanao
Sept
20. ZPHEP
Forum on Armed conflict i Sulu and Basilan: A Moro Perspective
Ozamis City

21. UMC-ZC
Duyog Ramahdan 2007
Al-barka, Basilan
October 12
22. UPLM
2ND Mindanao Assembly of People’s Lawyer
CDO
August 10
23. KASILO-Kibongkog
Seminar on Rice Organic Farming methods and Application
San Fernando, Bukidnon
August 10
24. NPO-IFI
HR discussion…HSA of 2007..
Pabayo-Pacana Sts., CDO
Sept 26
25. NAKASA- sta. cruz
Ed. Discussion on Women Sit... anti-violence against women and children’s act
Sta. Cruz, Consolacion, CDO
Sept. 29
25. KABIBA
Psycho therapy session
Ecoland subd., Davao City
Aug 1
26. KMP – DN-COMVAL
Forum on Peasant sit
Pots & Grill, Nat’l Hw-way, Tagum city
June 30
27. NAMADDS
Agri-production support to Farmers
Malawanit, Magsaysay, DS

28. NAMANGKA
Forum on HSA
Digos city
Aug 10
29. KASAMAKA
Intensive study on Mining Issue
Surigao city
Aug 30 – 31
30. NAMASUN
Community monitoring & Leadership Training
Surigao city
Aug 22 – 23
30. PCPR – DC
Forum Against Water Privatization
Obrero, DC

31. SCMP – DC
Cultural Protest & Mobilization Against RA 9372
DC
4th week August – 1st week Sept
32. MAPASU
Mapasu Assembly
Lianga, San Agustin, Marihatag, San Miguel
October 29
33. UMAN
Station MR…. ML anniversary
Butuan city
Sept 21
34. UPLM- Agusan del Norte & Butuan City Chapter
1st People’s Lawyer Assembly
Roldan Restaurant, South Montilla, Butuan city
October 6
35.CCPR
Forum on ML Reign of Terror: Its Effect to Phil’ History & the present
Pots & Grills, National Hi-way, Tagum City
Oct 5
36. KGML
Electoral ed
Lutay, Malungon, Sarangani
April 14
37. KAMALEG
Para-legal Trng
Sitio Linao, Alegria, Alabel, Sarangani
July 6-8
38. BUGSAY
Leadership Skills Trng
Reyes Beach Resort, Glan, Sarangani
July 2 – 4
39. BUGAS
Forum on HSA
Protect Center, Koronadal
Aug 18
40. NAKASA-sarangani
Facilitating Skills trng
Pob., Alabel, Sarangani
June 28 – 30
41. LUMAKAS
Relief Operation for Evacuees
Sitio Basak, Datal Anggas, Alabel Sarangani
Aug 14
42. Siocon Farmer’s Association and Siocon Women Association
Relief assissistance for 18 families/picketers at Siocon, ZN
Canatuan Siocon, ZDN
July 2
43. IFAAPR
Radio Forum
DxND-AM, Kidapawan city
December 9
44. KMP-Caraga
Peasant week celebration (mobilization)

Oct 11-19
45. KMU-Caraga
Forum on Labor
Butuan city
Nov. 20 – 30
46. FADC
Campaign Against JPEPA

Dec 5
47. NAMADIFTI
Women Empowerment for Wives of displaced workers
Panabo, DN

48. SELDA
Forum on the current state of HR in the Region


49. SBWHO
Botika sa Barangay Management
Sicayab, Bukana, Dapitan City
Dec 7-9
50. SISUFA
Production Support to Sinawayan Farmers
Sinawayan, Hagonoy, DS

51. CBHS
Medical Mission
Diatagon, Liangga, Surigao del Sur
Dec 6-7
52. KARAPATAN- Surigao del Sur
Solidarity and FFM
Diatagon, Liangga, Surigao del Sur
Dec. 6-7
53. Zambarec/ SCMP – ZC
Forum series on the protection of HR and Civil Liberties
WIMSU, ZC
Dec 9 & 10

81.53 % of ANDP activities were implemented by the NETWORKS in the cluster areas, including 5-area network orientations on IDPM 6. If we include those which are yet to be liquidated, the performance level of our Networks in ANDP activities would be around 95%. Our networks too help many of our MAs in program implementation.

Another item in the ANDP, which is already 100 % accomplished by our networks is fact-finding mission .

On the other hand, our SAF and its Education components is 33.33% implemented considering a target of 15 SAF/Education, wherein 5 of those are on implementation of
Cluster 1 and 4 PO Networks.

CONCORD’s Staff Initiated and Participated Activities with Networks



To place the poor, deprived, oppressed, exploited and struggling sectors in the forefront in addressing core issues affecting the access and control of resources


To capacitate POs to articulate and discuss pressing issues and work for their resolution

To raise public awareness on pressing issues and concerns affecting them
In our effort to widen our inclusiveness in building networks for realizing our ANDP goals and objectives, we initiated and participated advocacy works with our partner in the country and in international communities. Thus we hosted the Uniting Church of Canada (UCC)-CONTAK Philippines exposure program to mining site of Toronto Venture Incorporated (TVI), at Mount Kanatuan, Siocon, Zamboanga del Norte. We forged our solidarity on the care of the environment and in calling for the scrapping of Mining Act of 1999 which licensed large-scale mining companies a 100% exploitation and destruction of our land.

On the issue of the alarming situation of Human rights violations the country,
we supported and participated Human Rights activities of multi-sectoral alliance and
churches calling for the respect of International Human Rights Law ( IHL) and
Comprehensive Agreement for the Respect of Human Rights and International
Humanitarian Law (CARHRIHL). Thus, we hosted and participated Human Rights
fora/mobilizations conducted by UPLM, NPEACE Mindanao, KARAPATAN, and Ecumenical Bishops Forum (EBF).
The secretariat, also, extended solidarity with our PO members extrajudicially killed such as Siche Gandinao of Salay,Misamis Oriental and Renato Pacaide of Digos City
When the Writ of Amparo for Ruel Munasque was ilitigated at Pagadian City , we provided the needed “custody” required by the writ. Ruel is the first beneficiary of the Writ of Amparo in the Philippines and he was our former CDW in the District Conference of Northern Mindanao. (DCNM).

Our concern for the plight of our indigenous people also encourages us to strengthen our partnership with UN Commission on IP and EED-TFIP who are efficient advocacies of Indigenous peoples’ right to life and self-determination.
And being a Christian organization we also nurtured our partnership with churches and church-related institution. Among other things, we initiated consultation/dialogue with Silliman University Divinity School on the possibility of building partnership for its Field Education and Exposure program .

As an associate member of NCCP, we represented its 22nd General Assembly and
actively participated in giving suggestions and comments to actualize the
Theme: “Weaving the Patchwork of Justice and Peace in a Broken World.
A bilateral conference of NCCP and National Council of Churches in Japan (NCCJ) is equally represented by our secretariat.


C.2. CBDP

Now, let me present the status of our CBDP Implementation. CBDP has the goal of developing “further self-reliant, self- governing and self-sustaining people’s organizations that have significant influences of their own communities and linked with other partners in addressing development issues and concerns”.
Specific objectives of this program are:
To build the capabilities of CONCORD member agencies in promoting more active peoples` participation in development process
To strengthen and consolidate old POs and church-based coops
Each MA formed at least 5 new PO
Each MA launched at least I local sectoral campaign
MAs established at least 1 Municipal network of P O advocating priority issues in the area
At least 50% of old POs/coops established networking with other development
organization & agencies and church-based institution & organization
50 livelihood projects implemented
Training & education activities for PO leaders and members conducted


d.1.1 PO Organizing

The status of our CBDP PO organizing can be illustrated in the following graph:

MEMBER AGENCY

TARGET
ACTUAL NO. ORGANIZED

VARIANCE

%

FINDINGS
1. DCNM
5
2
-3
40
Black propaganda & harassment against CDW
2. WMC
5
6
+1
120
Coordination with network
3. DCNZ
5
2
-3
40
CDW Attitude towards work and poor coordination among CDWs, CEO & CORD
4. CMAC
5
5
0
100
Functional committee and in coordination with networks
5. LDC
5
6
+1
120
Coordination with local networks
6. ADC
5
4
-1
80
Coordination with local network
7. SDC
5
3
-2
60
CDWs positive attitude toward organizing
8. NDDC
5
4
-1
80
Coordination with local networks
9. SMDC
5
5
0
100
Coordination with local network
10. SCSDC
5
6
+1
120
Coordination with local network
11. CAC
5
1
-4
20
Militarized identified community
12. MI
5
0
-5
0
- deferred-
13. IN-A-PEACE
5
5
0
100
Well coordination between CEO & CDW
14.UMC-BSC
5
5
0
100
Coordination with local networks
15. EDSP
5
4
-1
80

16. PLASMA
5
5
0
100

17. MCSF
5
3
-2
60
Coordination with network
18. BRENT
5
3
-2
60

19.VCMC
5
3
-2
60
Functional task force/committee and coordination with urban poor communities
20. GICC
5
0
-5
0
Multiple tasking of CDW
21. PILGRIM
5
5
0
100
Coordination with network
22. BC
5
2
-3
40
Double tasking of CDW
23. FI
5
1
-4
20
Less receptive community because of black propaganda
24. JBI
5
0
-5
0
Pregnancy factor
25. DCFI
5
3
-2
60

26, DCSZ
1
0
-1
0
CBDP just started January 2008
TOTAL
126
82
- 44
65.07


Within a year of our CBDP implementation (January 2007-Devember 2007), we are able to establish 82 New Peoples Organizations out of 126 target. This puts our performance level to 65.07%. The remaining 44, which is 34.92%, is set to be accomplished within 6 months (January 2008-June 2008).
To date, of the targeted 26 Federations, only 5 federations are established by 5 MAs such as WMC,LDC, SCSDC,ADC & VCMC which accounts a performance of only 19.23%. The formation of federations which comprise Old and new POs will culminate only after accomplishing the IDPM VI targets.

d.1.2. Education and Training
On Education & Training allocated for the formation of 131 New POs , our data tell us the actual performance as against the 306 Education /Training target.

MAs
1st Semester Education
No. Educ
2nd Semester Education
No. Educ
Total
a. Conferences




1. DCNZ
None
0
None
0
0
2. DCNM
Campaign Planning
1
None
0
1
3. WMC
Peasant Orientation, health Skills
5
Peasant orientation
2
7
4. CMAC
Org’l mgt
Values, PMES,
6
PMES,Org’l, Social Awreness,
Financial Mgt
6
12
5. LDC
Coop, Leadership
2
Coop, leadership, finance, partnership, orgl
8
10
6. ADC
None
0
Dev t aggression, Urban poor sit study
2
2
7. SDC
None
0
Mass Camp.& Alliance training
1
1
8. NDDC
Electoral, mining
2
IDPM orientation, Project
4
6
9. SMDC
None
0
Leadership, Dev-Ag, VAWC/,HR
4
4
10. SCSDC
None
0
Su sag, leadership, orgl
3
3
11. CAC
None
0
Leadership, PRA
2
2
Sub Total
16

26
36
b. Devt Service Agency




1. In-A-Peace
PO orientation, team building
2
Finance mgt, livelihood trng
2
4
2. EDSP
Participatory Rural appraisal
2
PRA
2
4
3. PLASMA
Kapunungan sa Katawhan
1
Kapunungan sa Katawhan
4
5
4. UMC-
Leadership
2
Leadership trng
1
3
5. MCSF
None
0
Leadership trng, PO building
2
2
6. VCMC
None
0
None
0
0
7. Brent
Voters Education
1
None
0
1
Sub total
8

11
19
c. Church Related Institution




1. FI
PMES
1
None
0
1
2. GICC
Care & Management of Large cattle
1
None

1
3. PILGRIM
None
0


0
4. DCFI
None
0


0
5. JBI
Organizational Management
1
None
0
1
6. Brokenshire

none


Disaster management, VAWC,Proj.Mgt,3Ts,Livelihood Trng/Health
8
8

Sub total
3

8
11

TOTAL
27

50
77


Out of a target of 306 Education and Training budget, only 65 Ed/Training is being implemented which accounts to 21.24% performance.

d.1.3 CBDP-Livelihood Projects


Member Agency
Name of PO/Project
Number
1. In-A-Peace
Jambangan Self help Association - Coop
1
2. NDDC
Maniki Kapalong - Selling of trisikad spareparts
1

TOTAL
2

Out of a target of 50 Livelihood Projects, only 2 are implemented. This is only 8% performance on livelihood project implementation. This performance is impacted by the slow formation of federations which are beneficiaries of the livelihood allocations of Php 50,000.00 per federation.

C.3. IBP

Our Goal of implementing IBP is to ensure the effective, efficient management of programs/ components of IDPM VI.
Thus its specific objectives includes:
Equipping CDWs, CEOs, CORD/BOT and PO leaders with relevant skills to be effective and efficient advocates of people’s issues and concern
Providing CDWs, CEOs, CORD/BOT practical knowledge on the application of skills and capabilities learned as well as sharing of experiences


Education and Trainings

We have a target of 8 IBP Education and trainings for the whole IDPM VI period. Within a year of implementation, we accomplished the following trainings:

TOPIC
PARTICIPANT
DATE / VENUE
IDPM 6 Orientation
CEO,CDW,CORD
March 07/CEDEC
Mass Camp’n Mgt Training
CDW,PO Leaders
May 07/CEDEC
Mass Camp’n Mgt Training
Cluster Level PO Officers

Advocacy and Networking Training
Cluster Level PO Officers/CEO,CDW

Speakers, Basic Documentation and News writing training

CDW,PO Leaders

November 07/CDEC
Human Rights Orientation
CEO,CDW,PO Leaders
November-December 07

Out of a target of 8 IBP Education and Trainings, 6 are launched and accomplished which makes our IBP implementation performance to 75%.

C.4. RDP
The goal of RDP implementation is to update, maintain, generate & disseminate information to enhance the programs and services of Concord and its member agencies

Specific Objectives includes:

Updating & maintaining databank/ library
Gathering of data relevant for the present campaign of MAs/ CONCORD
Generating and disseminating information needed by CONCORD and member agencies
Our performance status on RDP implementation illustrates the following achievements:

We Published Second issue of “Kaugmaran” article. The 3rd and 4th Quarter Kaugmaran will be a one- issue news letter on its final layout for printing.
1st quarter Kaugmaran will be a special edition that can be used as a resource guide. The content will include the output of IDPM 6 orientation last year, VMG and Dvelopment Agenda. It will also include History of the Consortium written by Rev. Rudy Beley, Dr. Ely Mapanao and Rev. Eliaquim de Aquino in addition to what has been shared by Bishop Ben Barloso during the orientation. The cover is already with the printing press while the content is in its final stage of editing.
Upgraded internet Connection & established Local Area Network
Created Universal Regional Locator (URL) as alternative line to wedsite
Produced and reproduced IDPM V research on Development Aggression in Mindanao entitled:" Development Aggression in Mindanao; Plundering the Frontier”
Codified GA actions(25th,26th,31th,33rd,34th,35th,36th,37th)
Commissioned NPEACE for a research on the impact of Development Projects in Mindanao on IP, Women & Children
Radio Program is being coordinated by the secretariat to be implemented with networks in cluster areas. Cluster 3 already aired the program “Radyo sa Kahayag” with RCPA-resource Center of Peoples advocacy. A unified “stinger and program ID” has been produced with the help of RCPA.

PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION: GENERAL OBSERVATIONS

We shall now pose general observations on the aspect of program implementation performance which will provide one of the bases of our recommendations later.

It is notable that MA’s CBDP implementation performance is quite unsatisfactory: only 65.07% accomplishment in New PO organizing, 19.23% in Federation formation, 21.24% in CBDP Ed/Training and barley 8% in livelihood project implementation.

Our MA’s performance also in ANDP implementation scored low. Data pegged it to only 37.60%.

Our networks excellently accomplished their share of implementation and have even assisting many MAs in fast tracking activities.

Indeed, double-time efforts and coordination with networks, in the part of MA’s, should be undertaken so as to fully implement the program. It is practical and proper that all programs/allocations be expended not later than March 2008. April to June 2008 shall be set for implementation, monitoring, assessment, and narrative/finance reporting period.
Later on, we will recommend some measures in dealing ANDP program /allocations which can not be implemented by MAs on April to June 2008 period..

D. SCHOLARSHIP

After informing the German Ecumenical Scholarship Program (ESP) partner of our intention to pursue SEDEC and their subsequent concurrence to our commitment, we drafted the SEDEC II proposal and submitted it September 2, 2007, 5 days earlier than the due date which was set September 7, 2007 for November 2007 committee consideration.
Nonetheless, ESP conveyed later that our proposal needs some process of finalization on November 2007 wherein they will provide CONCORD additional guidelines to accomplished required details acceptable to ESP on March 2008 submission .
We expressed understanding to ESP’s decision and open ourselves for their continued guidance. When we asked updates of their direction, they sent us an e-mail explaining the reasons why ESP can not support SEDEC II anymore.

Among other reasons, EED’s termination of our IDPM programs has equally influenced ESP’s decision to take a break with CONCORD scholarship. They reasoned that ESP and EED share parallel programs with CONCORD.

E PROGRAM SUSTAINABILITY

Karl Schoenberg, EED program coordinator for CONCORD, reiterated , in his 25 November 2007 visit , that our IDPM VI will formally be terminated on June 2008.
This development is, indeed, challenging us to venture possibilities that would sustain our consortium’s development work in Mindanao and in the Visayas Islands outside EED funding.

Aside from searching another funding partner, three possible options should be undertaken to keep our consortium moving.

First, we need to create a CDEC Management Board whose task is the over-all management of CDEC.

Second, is to undertake and intensive collection of the sustainability fund of Php 4,000.00 per year/MA which the consortium collectively agreed in 1999. The target collection for our sustainability plan in 10 years time from 1999 is One (1) Million pesos. We are now on the 8th year of our Sustainability Fund scheme. Our collection status now is around Php 300,000.00 .

And finally, is to utilize available funds as sustainability measures particularly at the interim period, June to December 2008.

F. FINANCE
Internal Auditors Report (Comptroller)
Financial Statements (Treasurer

G. THE FUTURE OF CONCORD

As mentioned above, our partnership with EED in Integrated Development Program (IDPM) will terminate June 2008.

During our 25 November 2007 meeting, Karl Schoenberg recommended for CONCORD to redirect itself from the existing structure and programs for him to possibly facilitate future undertakings of our consortium .

In response to Karl’s suggestion, we conducted a Mindanao-wide and Cebu consultation wherein the collated output of which unanimously calls the setting up of new direction of CONCORD.

PRISMS, our EED-CONCORD program consultant, advised us to undergo an internal assessment first because new direction can only be set up on top of an assessment outputs, to which Karl agreed provided it gets General Assembly’s mandate.
For the main time, it would be good if the Members Agencies institutionalize their IDPM program by committing to take charge of IDPM continuation that includes staffing.

H. Recommendation

That CONCORD will undergo internal assessment with an external facilitator.
To authorize the BOT to facilitate the internal assessment with concomitant budget.
To approve the creation of the CDEC Management Board .

Mr. Chairman, Board of Trustees, Delegates and Guest, this is our humble share of presenting the state of our consortium on the occasion of our 38th General Assembly. We wish CONCORD all the strength and courage for people’s development, as we continue charting the future with hope.

Friday, July 18, 2008

Welcome to CONCORD

Brief History of Concord

The Consortium of Christian Organization on Rurban Development (CONCORD) arose from the situation of poverty, diseases, illiteracy, powerlessness and underdevelopment in Mindanao. Moved by the need to respond collectively to these situations, the Christian churches, development service agencies and institution of learning organized themselves into a consortium.

The consortium owes its beginning from the annual fellowship of women and men in the late 1960s` who were then rural church workers. They founded and gave shape and substance to Concord in Midsayap, Cotabato on June 23, 1970, as a vehicle for coordinated planning and action. It was originally constituted by 6 member agencies namely: Cotabato Annual Conference, Cotabato Rural Uplift Movement, Mindanao Christian Services Foundation, Southern Christian College, Southern Mindanao Annual Conference and the Mindanao Annual Conference of the United Methodist Church and was incorporated on February 1, 1978. It has since then expanded to the Visayas. It now has 27 members including 8 development and services agencies, 11 church conferences and 8 church related schools.

For over a period of thirty seven years, Concord through joint strategizing and efforts, have undertaken a wide variety of programs ranging from functional literacy, land titling, community health, agriculture, adult education, out-of school youth, relief & rehabilitation, justice and human rights, community organizing, cooperative formation, scholarship programs and other development works.

Strategic Directions

Vision

CONCORD envisions a society

Where justice, unity and love reign supreme without discrimination of culture , creed, race, gender and social status;

Where all people are empowered and free to determine their future

Where God`s creation is responsibly managed such that all are able to partake of the abundance in life

Mission

As venue for joint and coordinated development efforts in Mindanao, CONCORD is committed to develop the organizational capacities of member agencies working towards the holistic development of the poor, deprived, oppressed and exploited, and struggling sectors of the society.

Goals

1. To develop self-sustaining, self-reliant and self-governing peoples` organizations that significantly influence the development of their own communities;

  1. To reinforce work towards justice, peace and care of God`s creation by strengthening and expanding coordinated linkages and networks among member agencies and with the other Christian organizations, NGOs and peoples` organizations;

  1. To promote greater Lumad-Moro-Christian coordination and dialogues by supporting the establishment and strengthening of Moro-Lumad peoples` self- organization;

  1. To contribute to the advancement of gender and development efforts by deepening the consciousness and enhancing the capability of member agencies to address gender issues and concerns;

  1. To ensure the sustainability of the benefits derived by the target sectors from CONCORD`s endeavors.

Programs and Services

A. Integrated Development Program in Mindanao (IDPM)

IDPM brings together the resources and expertise of member agencies in a committed effort to bring about holistic development of the poor, deprived and oppressed and struggling sectors in Mindanao

  1. Community Based Development Program (CBDP)

CONCORD has built more than 300 peoples` organizations and cooperatives. It continues to consolidate their capabilities and ensures the sustainability by undertaking the training of community organizers and development workers and of leader-managers in cooperative livelihood projects.

  1. Institution Building Program (IBP)

CONCORD builds its own capacity for continuous education and training of leaders of the member agencies in gender relations, values and commitment, social awareness, leadership and various management skills.

  1. Research and Documentation Program (RDP)

In the new information age, CONCORD seeks to build its capacity to generate, analyze, store and disseminate information for action through training of researchers, writers and data handlers.

  1. Advocacy and Networking Program (ANP)

This program seeks to broaden dialogue and linkages between CONCORD member agencies with and among Moro-Lumad-Christian peoples` organizations and non-government organizations in the work for justice, peace and integrity of creation and for gender and development issues. Under this program is the Discretionary Fund; CONCORD encourages and supports the development initiatives in broader society and among Moro-Lumad-Christian communities.

B. Scholarship Program

CONCORD has undertaken human resources development program to train future leaders of CONCORD and member agencies through an academic scholarship program. The beneficiaries are youth who are poor but who have the potential for leadership in peoples` organizations, development agencies and church related institutions.

Concord Organizational Structure

General Assembly


Board of Trustees








Executive Committee

Projects Committee


CDEC Committee











Secretariat

Scholarship Committee

Finance Committee



Personnel Committee




Member Agencies

( MAs )


Church Conferences


Church Related Institution


Development Service Agencies











The General Assembly (GA) that is the highest policy-making body of the consortium governs CONCORD. Composed of two representatives from each of the member institutions, the GA sets the direction of CONCORD based on their assessment of the needs and interests of the people of Mindanao in an annual meeting. Decisions are made by consensus.

The CONCORD Board of Trustees exercises corporate powers of the GA in between meetings. It is composed of nine (9) representatives elected during the general Assembly sessions and equitably distributed to the three sectors namely the Church (3), Service Agencies (2) and Academe (3). The Board meets regularly twice a year, conducts business and controls the consortium’s properties

The Executive Committee oversees CONCORD’s operation. It is composed of the president, the vice president, and the corporate secretary. The treasurer and the general Secretary sits as ex-officio members. The executive committee members are elected from

Among the members of the Board and hold their positions for a one year term

Apart from these structures, CONCORD has created different committees to coordinate plans and programs related to the consortium’s life and work. These are 1) Projects committee 2) Finance Committee 3) Personnel committee 4) Scholarship committee and 5) Concord Development Education Center (CDEC) Committee. These committees assist the Board in setting directions, plan, and monitor and evaluate particular programs.

The secretariat oversees the daily operations of the consortium and provides the necessary staff support to the committees.

Board and Staff Composition

Board of Trustees

President : Rev. Eliaquim de Aquino

Vice President : Rev. Pablo de la cruz, Jr

Secretary : Ms. Leilaneeh Sabacahan

Members :

Rev. Gil Alamarez

Dr. Alexis Montes

Rev. Manuel Rapisura

Rev. Ruth Janoras

Rev. Gerson Senturias

Mr. Rodolfo Alegado

Coopted Members:

Rev. Melzar Labuntog

Rev. Ruben Balonga

Secretariat

General Secretary : Rev. Beltran E. Pacatang

Corporate Treasurer : Ms. Marely Prado

Comptroller : Mr. Marvin Daul

Information Management

Officer : Mr. Leonardo Vicente Corrales

Officer Secretary : Mr. Francisco Arguelles

Bookkeeper : Ms. Erika Sanchez

Program Coordinators :

Mr. Elmer Sagbigsal (Community-Based Development Program)

Rev. Cromwell Esteban Rabaya ( Research Documentation Program)

Mr. Armando Naul (Advocacy, Networking and Dialogue Program)

Rev. Amancio Benigian (Institution Building Program)

Number of Male and female = Male 17 . female 4

Track Records and Work Experience

In its 37 years of serving the poor deprived, oppressed and struggling sector in Mindanao, Concord has been working with various funding partners and agencies.

In the 1970s and 1980s` Concord has linked with the Bread for the World (BfW) in setting up the cooperative and literacy program for the indigenous peoples. It program also geared towards solving the century problem of the farmers through land titling program

The Integrated Development Program in Mindanao (IDPM) was designed to comprehensively address the problems of the farmers, fisherfolks, Moro, Indigenous peoples and women. The IDPM 1 to 3 was realized through the partnership of EZE and IDPM 4 and 5 with the support of EED.

Four scholarships program has been implemented The first scholarship was the Action M then it was followed with the SPADES, deserving but poor (DBP) and the Sedec –Scholarship for Education and Development of Communities. This program was realized through the partnership of Ecumenical Scholarship Program (ESP)

Cooperation & Representation in Networks of the Civil Society

CONCORD has twenty-five participating institution representing various sectors like the church- 11 conferences of the United Church of Christ in the Philippines, 8 Service and Development Agencies and the remaining 8 belongs to the Academe

Concord is related to programs of:

1.Christian Conference of Asia (CCA)

2.Yong Dong PO Asian Urban Industrial

Mission

Member, Kalinaw Mindanao (InPeace Mindanao

Concord related to Ecumenical Bodies such as:

1. National Council of Churches in the Philippines (NCCP)

2 .United Church of Christ in the Philippines (UCCP)

3 .United Methodist Church (UCM)

4. Episcopal Church of the Philippines

5. Christian Missionary Alliance Church

6. Ecumenical Bishops Forum

7. Aid Watch Philippines


INTERNAL ASSESSMENT: Terms of Reference


CONCORD Evaluation
June 2008
1 of 5
TERMS OF REFERENCE
Consultancy Plan for the Internal Evaluation of the
Consortium of Christian Organizations for Rurban Development
(CONCORD, Inc.)
1. Consultancy Mission Statement
On July 2008, The 18-month phase out period of the Integrated Development
Program for Mindanao (IDPM VI) Project with EED ends. For the Consortium of
Christian Organizations for Rurban Development (CONCORD), the occasion
marks more than 25 solid years of partnership with EED (formerly EZE) and over
15 years of integrated program planning for the 25 Consortium members.
In the Board meeting of December 2007 and the subsequent 38th General
Assembly last February 2008, the need to evaluate the whole Consortium was
identified. The 38th General Assembly called for new directions with renewed
challenges as brought about by the major change in the Consortium’s long
strategic resource partnership with EED.
Essentially, the evaluation-consultancy will be an internal review of the recent
programs operations with emphasis on identifying the institutional, organizational
and governance aspects impinging on the optimum pursuit of the Consortium’s
vision, mission, goals and programs. Such an evaluation has not occurred since
the IDPM III 1998 midterm exercise.
An external person will be commissioned to facilitate the internal evaluation of
CONCORD.
2. Problem Statement
EED phasing out of the partnership is a major juncture in CONCORD’s life as an
organization. It will be an opportune time to review, reflect and seek new
directions. Direction-setting and its pursuit is a function of leadership and
governance. Finding directions is a function of weaving vision and reality.
Emanating from the General Assembly, the Board of Trustees is mandated to
perform the function.
The emergent concern for CONCORD is forging new strategic resource partners
and future learning to deal with a host of donors, which unfortunately the
consortium has not undergone in the last 2 decades as it had a special almost
exclusive relationship with EED.
Another subject of concern is the dilemma of governance. With regards to joint
program such as the IDPM, who governs whom and on what matters? What are
the priorities in the multiplicity of Consortium and member goals? How are
CONCORD Evaluation
June 2008
2 of 5
performance accountabilities defined and distributed? What is the Consortium
Secretariat’s pertinent decision-making span?
As a consortium, it is said to be “congregational in heritage, autonomous in polity
and devolved in operation” (1998 IDPM III Evaluation Report.) In terms of
Consortium leadership and management, this may need to be operationally laid
out.
This evaluation is being initiated in order to help the Board to find new courses of
action not only in program goal terms but to include the development and
maintenance of the consortium-building function itself. The evaluation exercise
should help the Board define and address leadership and management issues in
a consortium such as CONCORD.
3. Boundaries
a. The evaluation engagement will focus the Consortium Secretariat and
Board and pertinent program-functional relationships with the Member
Agencies as defined in General Assembly terms.
b. The review will neither examine nor analyze the operations of individual
member agencies, which are not covered by prior agreements. They will
be dealt with as clusters or aggregate.
c. The engagement will provide a periodic feedback and report of the
process and recommendations to the General Secretary and/ or the
Internal Evaluation Project Committee.
d. The engagement will not examine nor analyze the financial operations of
the Consortium.
e. The proposed structure & policy changes arising from engagement is
recommendatory and subject to approval by the appropriate decisionmaking
bodies and authorities.
4. Specific Issues to be Addressed
The evaluation will:
a. With the IDPM as platform, analyze the strengths and weaknesses, the
facilitating and hindering factors that influence the degree of
consortium joint programming, its implementation and delivery
b. Identify the issues related to management and implementation
processes of the consortium (institution) building programs
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c. Identify the good practices and the lessons learned from selected
consortium intervention and approaches.
d. Analyse and list the requirements and demands of the memberagencies
and various stakeholders to be defined in consultation with
the Secretariat.
e. Analyse and list the requirements of policies generating from the Board
members and the General Assembly
f. Consult with allied NGOs and agencies who can help provide advice
and assistance on the social issues and contexts CONCORD wishes
to address.
g. Analyse the existing organizational strategic resource levels to
ascertain if institutional resources are at optimum to conform to the
relevant future consortium goals.
h. Ascertain the demands placed on the Secretariat to guide the Board in
their governance and support function.
i. Prepare and submit report to the General Secretary and or the
Evaluation Project Committee.
5. Methodology
The proposed evaluation shall use a combination of methods as follows:
a. Review of Documents
• Review of literature: proposals, reports, program conceptual and
planning papers, feasibility studies, evaluation reports and other
relevant documents.
• Review of Existing Performance Information Sources. Identify the
existence and availability of relevant performance information sources,
such as performance monitoring systems and/or previous evaluation
reports. A summary of the types of data available, the time frames, and
an indication of their quality and reliability will be requested by the
evaluation research team to build on what is already available.
b. Key Informant Interviews
• Interviews will be conducted with persons who have direct participation
in program management and implementation. This includes trainerCONCORD
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resource persons, board members, members as well as former
executives who can provide pertinent information for the evaluation.
c. Focus Group Discussions
• FGDs will be conducted among representatives of the member
agencies in clusters, participants, staff, local church and community
leaders that have participated in the program. These will be held one
each for each of the four clusters.
d. Survey of Service Delivery and Member agency perceptions.
6. Evaluation Work Plan
Activities Week
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
Proposed
Dates
Finalization of Contract x June
Start-up & review of project documents x June
Field work to conduct interview & focus
group discussions, survey
x x x x June 10-30*
(Staggered)
Cluster 1
Cluster 2
Cluster 3
Cluster 4
Feedback & Initial Analysis x July 7/8
Write-up of draft report
Validation meeting with core staff and
Board or representatives
July 28
Final Report Submission x August 1
* Specific dates/itinerary to be worked out
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7. The Cost of the Engagement
For the above services, we will charge a professional fee in the amount of three
hundred thousand pesos (P300,000.00). We request for a down payment of 50%
of the amount upon signing of the agreement, 30% upon the submission of the
draft report and the payment of the balance upon the submission of the Final
Report. Out of pocket expenses such as required travel to sites will be billed as
incurred or at the end of the engagement.
If the terms of this proposal are acceptable to you, please signify your
concurrence by signing on the space provided on the two copies of this letter and
returning the duplicate copy to us at a convenient time.
We thank you for this opportunity to offer our services to you and we look forward
to working with you on this engagement.
Truly yours,
CONFORME:
Delfin Teodulo A. Borrero II Rev. Beltran Pacatang
Evaluation Team Leader General Secretary
CONCORD